Large parts of the building from the post-war period were torn down and rebuilt with a historicising façade.

Project details

Reference object

Renovation of the office building "Zum schönen Turm", Munich, Germany

Clay roof tiles used

Beaver tiles with lobster-back construction

Renovation gentlemen's outfitters Hirmer

Renovation gentlemen's outfitters Hirmer

Renovation gentlemen's outfitters Hirmer

Renovation gentlemen's outfitters Hirmer

Renovation gentlemen's outfitters Hirmer

Renovation gentlemen's outfitters Hirmer

Renovation gentlemen's outfitters Hirmer

Renovation gentlemen's outfitters Hirmer

Renovation gentlemen's outfitters Hirmer

Renovation gentlemen's outfitters Hirmer

The history

Munich’s well-to-do merchants used to live here. In the 19th century, the Baroque houses were replaced with shops. The largest of the time was the business premises “Zum Schönen Turm”. It was built in 1914 by architects Eugen Honig and Karl Söldner. During the Second World War, most of the buildings on Kaufingerstraße were destroyed and ultimately demolished. From 1990, the structures of the 1950’s and 1960’s were gradually replaced with postmodern or historicising buildings. Since 1971, Kaufingerstraße has been a pedestrian zone. With around 15,000 passers-by per hour, this shopping street has one of the highest levels of sales in Germany and with rental prices of around EUR 300 per square metre is one of the most expensive addresses in the world.

Historicised façade

Where the office building “Zum Schönen Turm” once stood is today the head office of well-known gentlemen’s outfitters Hirmer. Large parts of the building from the post-war period were torn down in 2007/2008 and rebuilt with a historicising facade, which resembles the original building, while satisfying the requirements of a modern store. The building was completely enclosed in winter 2008/2009 and the facade and roofing work carried out. For the 1,500 square metre roof, Wienerberger delivered 1.4 cm thick beaver tiles with lobster-back construction measuring 18 x 38 centimetres.

Complex detailing

One special architectural feature of the renowned store is its rounded corner, which continues in an equally rounded hip on the roof. While this detail may initially appear unspectacular, a rounded hip actually represents a considerable technical level of complexity.

Aesthetic technique

What is special about a roof covered with beaver tiles is that the minimum overlap of the tiles depends on the pitch of the roof. The lower the pitch, the greater the overlap must be in order to ensure that a beaver tile roof is watertight. In Munich, the rounded part of the roof around the hip was particularly difficult: the area in question has a lower pitch than the main roof and must therefore have a correspondingly higher overlap. Because the rows of tiles to the left and right of the rounding flow into and over each other at the same batten height, the higher overlaps from the rounding would usually have to be adopted by the steeper roof sections as well. The unnecessarily large overlaps this would have caused in the steep parts of the roof would have made the roofing work more expensive. The final solution was to overlap the main roof surfaces slightly more than necessary. At the hip rounding, some rows of tiles were added into the eaves in order to achieve a higher overlap there. As a result, the tiles running around the eaves are raised slightly, giving a look and aesthetic reminiscent of an eyebrow dormer. This allowed efficiency and aesthetics to be harmoniously combined in this technically demanding roof.

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