Buildings like the Hans-Erlwein-Gymnasium in Dresden tell their own story: about the design concept, the architectural style at the time of their creation and their changing significance in terms of urban development. The building, which was meanwhile placed under a conservation order, underwent comprehensive restoration between 2012 and 2014.

Project details

Project
Refurbishment of the Hans-Erlwein-Gymnasium in Dresden, Germany
Architect
Elbcontor Architekten, Dresden
Client
City of Dresden
Roofer
Zimmereihandwerk Aufbau GmbH, Chemnitz
Roof tiles
Kormaic Alegra 12 - deep black engobed , E32, Stormfix
Roof area 2 950 m2
 

Refurbishment of the Hans-Erlwein-Gymnasium in Dresden, Germany © Sven-Erik Tornow, Wienerberger GmbH

Refurbishment of the Hans-Erlwein-Gymnasium in Dresden, Germany © Sven-Erik Tornow, Wienerberger GmbH

Refurbishment of the Hans-Erlwein-Gymnasium in Dresden, Germany  © Sven-Erik Tornow, Wienerberger GmbH

Refurbishment of the Hans-Erlwein-Gymnasium in Dresden, Germany © Sven-Erik Tornow, Wienerberger GmbH

Refurbishment of the Hans-Erlwein-Gymnasium in Dresden, Germany © Sven-Erik Tornow, Wienerberger GmbH

Refurbishment of the Hans-Erlwein-Gymnasium in Dresden, Germany © Sven-Erik Tornow, Wienerberger GmbH

Refurbishment of the Hans-Erlwein-Gymnasium in Dresden, Germany  © Sven-Erik Tornow, Wienerberger GmbH

Refurbishment of the Hans-Erlwein-Gymnasium in Dresden, Germany © Sven-Erik Tornow, Wienerberger GmbH

Refurbishment of the Hans-Erlwein-Gymnasium in Dresden, Germany © Sven-Erik Tornow, Wienerberger GmbH

Refurbishment of the Hans-Erlwein-Gymnasium in Dresden, Germany © Sven-Erik Tornow, Wienerberger GmbH

The building

The school was built between 1912 and 1914 in the Dresden district of Gruna under the supervision of Hans Erlwein, head of the Dresden City Building Department. To this day, the building consists of the north and south wings, which are linked by a recessed central section with a dining hall on the raised ground floor, a gymnasium on the first floor and passageways on the second and third floor. The whole block comprises five storeys in addition to the basement and attic floors. While the building is dominated by the two wings, which form prominent corners with clearly defined façades, the central linking section is distinguished by a curved avant-corps or protruding front part with balcony. The respective roofs give the building an upper end appropriate to the distinctive architecture. An elongated mansard roof interrupted by dormers is topped by a hipped roof. The fifth floor and the attic floors are visually separated by a cornice at eaves level. The roof of the linking structure is divided into two parts: the lower part is a classic mansard roof, which is interrupted on the street elevation by five eyebrow dormers; the upper section is a very steep double-pitch roof, whose ridge is about 15 m lower than that of the roofs of the two wings, and which ends in the rear part of the respective hips.

Ideal combination

The restoration carried out in 2012-14 according to designs of Elbcontor Architekten, Dresden, included reorganisation measures to adapt the building to the requirements of the future school operation. The refurbishment of the building envelope under energy-consumption aspects, which involved the installation of new windows, also included a complete renewal of the roof. The roof was re-tiled in conformity with conservation requirements using Koramic Alegra 12 tiles with a deep black engobe finish. Koramic E32 tiles with a matching colour and profile were used on all of the mansard roofs. This tile offered advantages in forming the eyebrow dormers due to its range of special shapes in including A-shaped formats and those tapered either on the left or right.

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