Built from ecological materials, with very low energy consumption and no loss of comfort – it sounds almost like a fairy tale.

Project details

Project

Single-family house, Mortier, Belgium

Architect

Claudy Mercenier, ARTerre, Fléron

Client

Private

Roofer

Emmanuel Liegeois, Herve

Clay roof tiles used

Migeon Actua slate engobe

Single-family house in Mortier, Belgium

Single-family house in Mortier, Belgium

Single-family house in Mortier, Belgium

Single-family house in Mortier, Belgium

Single-family house in Mortier, Belgium

Single-family house in Mortier, Belgium

Single-family house in Mortier, Belgium

Single-family house in Mortier, Belgium

Single-family house in Mortier, Belgium

Single-family house in Mortier, Belgium

Single-family house in Mortier, Belgium

Single-family house in Mortier, Belgium

Single-family house in Mortier, Belgium

Single-family house in Mortier, Belgium

Building with energy

But for the Lambregts family from Mortier the dream has become a reality. And they have architect Claudy Mercenier from ARTerre to thank for this. Within the scope of the “Building with energy” campaign, architect Mercenier set himself the goal of designing a house that has outstanding thermal insulation and therefore benefits ideally from the available solar energy. He also remained true to his preference for ecological building materials: materials that harm neither health nor the environment. The result: A house with 179 square metres of living space, which is comfortable and pronouncedly energy-saving and also harmonises perfectly with its surroundings.

In perfect harmony with nature

The house is heated with a pellet furnace, while a mechanical ventilation system with a heat recycling function provides a comfortable indoor climate. Hot water is supplied through solar collectors and in the future, photovoltaic panels will convert solar energy into electricity. “The choice of the shell shape is not only aesthetically motivated,” explains the architect. The curvature on the north of the building serves as a cold buffer, while the inclined south-facing side lets sun in and affords a view of the landscape. For the roofing, Mercenier chose the anthracitecoloured, matt clay roof tile Koramic Migeon Actua. “I’m a big fan of clay roof tiles,” he says. “They are value for money, simple to lay and give sloping roofs a nice, rhythmic effect. In this case, I decided on Migeon Actua because of its large, economic format, its simple and unadorned lines, and because its colour harmonises perfectly with the surrounding houses. Like wood, clay roof tiles also acquire a lovely patina over time. The result is a house that changes with the seasons and the natural surroundings in which it is embedded. Just like a real snail."

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