The historic warehouses and storehouses in Copenhagen Harbor count among the most beautiful industrial areas in Denmark. Many of the brick buildings standing here are already 300 years old and have been converted into residential, office and cultural spaces in the recent past.

Project Details

Project Krøyers Plads, Copenhagen, Denmark
Architect
Vilhelm Lauritzen Architects, and COBE
Year of Completion
2016
Products used
Wienerberger Urban

red brick cladding facade detail view Krøyers Plads Denmark

Krøyers Plads, Denmark © Rasmus Hjortshøj

red and grey brick facade texture detail view Krøyers Plads Denmark

Krøyers Plads, Denmark © Rasmus Hjortshøj

Krøyers Plads Denmark view from above river

Krøyers Plads, Denmark © Rasmus Hjortshøj

street view brick building people strolling Krøyers Plads Denmark

Krøyers Plads, Denmark © Rasmus Hjortshøj

red  brick facade texture detail view woman standing windows Krøyers Plads Denmark

Krøyers Plads, Denmark © Rasmus Hjortshøj

red brick facade texture side view apartment building Krøyers Plads Denmark

Krøyers Plads, Denmark © Rasmus Hjortshøj

grey and red brick facade windows front view Krøyers Plads Denmark

Krøyers Plads, Denmark © Rasmus Hjortshøj

red brick facade apartment building windows front view river Krøyers Plads

Krøyers Plads, Denmark © Rasmus Hjortshøj

Involving the Residents

Involving the residents
Only Krøyers Plads remained untouched for a long time: Many project developers got engaged in the abandoned area directly situated on the water and proposed concepts that were all rejected by the local population. In the end, the decision was made to develop the 20,000-square-meter industrial compound in a participative and direct democratic manner and to involve the residents in the planning process. 
 
"Thanks to the different bricks with their equally varied structures, we could react to the surroundings and prompt a dialog between old and new, between lightness and heaviness." COBE Architects
What resulted is a lively little piece of city, placed at the water’s edge like a fine, carefully crafted filling between the Royal Danish Theater and Freetown Christiania. Three volumes soar up to six stories skywards and orientate themselves in terms of location, size and proportion to the surrounding development. The folded roof surfaces, which stand out like an angular hill contour on the façade, act as a slightly playful quote of the historic gables, dormers and little crane houses that have characterized the harbor from time immemorial.

Custom-made Bricks

Particularly sensitive is the choice of materials, since the architects decided to individually develop two completely different bricks and to carry the diversity of the location into the present in this way. In collaboration with a brick manufacturer, a shingle-like brick, which covers the entire roof landscape and parts of the façade, was produced.  “The building material plays a central role in this project,” Dan Stubbergaard, Founder and Chief Architect of COBE, explains. “We let ourselves get inspired by the red and ochre of the historic buildings. Thanks to the different bricks with their equally varied structures, we could react to the surroundings and prompt a dialog between old and new, between lightness and heaviness.”

Award-winning Sustainability

Krøyers Plads comprises 105 apartments featuring between 80 and 250 square meters of living space, numerous shops and restaurants, as well as a supermarket. The entire project was planned according to the principles of sustainability and resource conservation, which fall 40 percent below the legally stipulated energy threshold values. For the socially and ecologically unusual approach, the completed urban implant already received several awards—among others, the Green Good Design Award and the Nordic Eco-Label.

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